Stories By 'Timothy Aryal'
The nature of identity is twofold: First is physical identity—the tangible things that everyone can see and feel, comprised essentially of the people and physical structures. The second type of identity is the metaphysical identity of a place which is far more elusive and harder to define. It does not involve the superficial aspects of society and one has to dig beneath the surface to find it—it exists in the festivals, everyday rituals, and most of all, in the art and the music that people make.
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Panchayat, a historical drama set in the Panchayat era, will be Nepal’s contender for the Academy Awards Foreign Language Oscars race. The film was written and directed by Shivam Adhikari.
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A graceful Frida Kahlo painting welcomes visitors to Ishan Pariyar’s solo show at GG Machan in Pulchok. Wearing a traditional Nepali garb, Kahlo sits on a boat, hands on her lap, looking on, beside a lotus flower sprouting out of the boat itself, solemn and pensive—for someone not familiar with this Mexican folk artist, she may come across as just another attractive woman from the western hills.
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When the Gurukul Theatre was dissolved in 2012, many thought it sounded the death knell for private theatres in the Valley. Led by playwright Sunil Pokharel, Gurukul had become an institution, producing plays, training actors and helping popularise Nepali theatre. There were fears among the public that with the closing down of Gurukul, the nascent theatre scene in Kathmandu might collapse. These fears turned out to be unfounded. Since then, the theatre scene in Kathmandu has boomed, with Sarwanam, Mandala, Shilpee, and new entrants Kunja and Kausi churning out quality plays on a regular basis.
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When the Gurukul Theatre was dissolved in 2012, many thought it sounded the death knell for private theatres in the Valley.
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It’s no news that Kathmandu’s theatregoers have a penchant for slapstick humour. Give them some and they will embrace it with hearty laughs even if the execution is sometimes half-baked. This has led to, as some critics have pointed out, directors often forcibly inserting humour where it is not warranted, breaking up a play’s rhythm and taking it off into tangents.
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