Health and Living

Do flip-flops protect against athlete’s foot?

Yes. Wearing footwear probably helps. Athlete’s foot is the common name for fungal infections of the skin of the foot. The medical term is tineapedis.

Aug 09 2018

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Sauna users have fewer chronic diseases

People who visit the sauna frequently may be less likely to develop heart and lung diseases or to get the flu than those who rarely go, a research review suggests. Past studies on the health benefits of saunas have yielded mixed results because they focused on many different types of sauna and were too small or brief to assess long-term health outcomes from routine use, the authors note in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Aug 09 2018

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Overweight kids slim down using video games

Obese kids may be able to drop weight with the help of an unlikely aid: video games. Special exercise video games helped overweight children drop pounds—and improve their cholesterol and blood pressure—while they were having fun, in a study reported in Pediatric Obesity. It makes more sense to co-opt kids’ favourite pastime than to fight it. Kids are really interested in this and spend hours a week playing. So, rather than blame the games and technology, it made sense to see how they could help.

Aug 09 2018

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Take a vacation from exercise? Your body may not thank you

At the height of summer, naps at the beach can be alluring, and many of us may find ourselves tempted to take prolonged vacations from exercise.

GRETCHEN REYNOLDS, Aug 09 2018

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Even low air pollution may damage heart

Regular exposure to even low levels of air pollution may cause changes to the heart similar to those in the early stages of heart failure, experts say.

Alex Therrien, Aug 09 2018

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Does fidgeting counter the harmful effects of sitting?

Fortunately for those of us who often are deskbound, exercise scientists agree that any movement, no matter how slight, counts as physical activity and can be consequential. For one thing, moving and fidgeting in our chairs, which some researchers oxymoronically call “dynamic sitting,” burns calories.

Aug 02 2018

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Dizziness could increase dementia risk

Middle-aged people who feel dizzy when standing up from a lying-down position may be at a higher risk of dementia or a stroke in the future, a report says. The light-headed feeling is caused by a sudden drop in blood pressure, which is known as orthostatic hypotension (OH).

Aug 02 2018

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Healthy kids with sick sibling may hide emotions

Healthy kids with chronically ill siblings may suppress their own needs as they adapt to shifting family dynamics that are focused on caring for the child who is sick, a research suggests. While it’s logical to assume healthy kids in this situation might experience strong emotions, running the gamut from anger to fear to stress, much of the research to date has focused on parents’ perceptions of how children feel.

Aug 02 2018

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Focus on what’s important, not just urgent

Back in the days when American presidents didn’t spend literally every waking hour gratifying their appetite for cruelty or cheeseburgers, Dwight Eisenhower came up with a classic time management technique, later named the Eisenhower Matrix. (If you’ve read one chapter of one productivity book, you’ve encountered it.) His point, in short, was that every potential activity is either urgent or not, and either important or not. Life’s primary challenge is to make time for the important stuff that isn’t urgent, even though it doesn’t feel pressing, while avoiding the urgent stuff that isn’t important, even though it does feel pressing.

Oliver Burkeman, Aug 02 2018

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Recognising eating disorders in time to help

Eating disorders pose serious hazards to adolescents and young adults and are often hidden from family, friends and even doctors, sometimes until the disorders cause lasting health damage and have become highly resistant to treatment.

JANE E BRODY, Aug 02 2018

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Is there such a thing as traveller’s constipation’?

Traveller’s constipation is probably real. And the scientific evidence behind it is fascinating.

Jul 26 2018

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New dads need depression screening

Fathers of young children may be almost as likely as new mothers to experience symptoms of depression, a study suggests. Researchers examined results from depression screenings done for parents during more than 9,500 visits to pediatrics clinics with their children. Overall, 4.4 percent of fathers and five percent of mothers screened positive for depression.

Jul 26 2018

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Parents’ childhood trauma tied to behaviour problems in kids

Parents who had a lot of traumatic or stressful experiences during childhood may be more likely to have kids with behavioural problems, a study suggests.

Jul 26 2018

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Social media and celebrity culture ‘harming young people’

Airbrushed photographs of celebrities with perfectly preened bodies staged in exotic locations are all over social media, but such flawless images have been described as damaging for the way they pressurise young people to meet unobtainable body-image standards.

Nazia Parveen, Jul 26 2018

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When we eat maybe critical for health

Nutrition scientists have long debated the best diet for optimal health. But now some experts believe that it’s not just what we eat that’s critical for good health, but when we eat it.

Anahad O’Connor, Jul 26 2018

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