Seasonal workers throng Chitwan as locals opt for foreign jobs

- PAWAN YADAV, BECHU GAUD, Bharatpur
Seasonal workers throng Chitwan as locals opt for foreign jobs

Jul 18, 2015-

Agricultural workers from inner Tarai and bordering Indian villages are thronging Chitwan as the district faces a labour shortage due to migration of youths for foreign employment.

Adequate income has played a catalytic role in increasing the flow of these seasonal workers to the districts. Vegetable farmers in particular are witnessing brisk business. Some lease land at remote villages, while others work as contract workers. They get attractive wages.

Raghu Bir Baitha, of Samanpur 6, has been visiting Chitwan for the past 20 years to involve in farm work. “Coming to Chitwan serves two purposes. First it is a good place for refreshment and second, it is also a source of income.”

He said since most of the youths from villages in Chitwan have gone abroad for foreign employment, it is easier to find job here. “There is no dearth of work here, but there is a dearth of workers,” he said.

About 90 percent of the farm workers in Chitwan hail from Tarai districts and India. More than 1,000 workers have come to the district from Bara, Parsa, Rautahat and Siraha and Indian towns and villages like Ghodasahan, Chauda Dano, Muzzafarpur and Kriha Kowa.

These workers also get attractive facilities besides wages. They get non-veg meal two times a day and launch free of cost.

Ruplal Ram of Rautahat, who has been visiting Chitwan for the last 15 years, said the demand of workers has increased significantly over the past few years. “There is no tension about lodging and food,” he said. “All the arrangements are made by the employers.”

Ram, who usually comes with a team of eight, feels working during leisure time is better than staying idle. He said around 400 workers from Rautahat alone come to Chitwan to utilise their free time.

These workers generally take jobs on a contract basis and take onetime payment. They charge Rs400 per day for plucking saplings per Kattha. They work for 25 days to a month and return back to their homes.

According to Raju Mahato, a land owner based in Mohona, Rantnanagr, they are compelled to hand over contract to the migratory workers due to unavailability of local workers. “There is a dearth of workers here,” he said.

Published: 19-07-2015 08:07

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