Print Edition - 2018-08-05  |  Life & Style

Zombie Boy dead of apparent suicide

- AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE, Los Angeles

Aug 5, 2018-

Canadian model and artist Zombie Boy—who was found dead of an apparent suicide at his home in Montreal—used his head-to-toe tattoos to earn international notice, from the catwalks of Paris to a video for pop superstar Lady Gaga.

Zombie Boy, whose real name was Rick Genest, died this week in his hometown of Montreal, his agent Dulcedo Management said. He was 32.

The cause of death was not officially announced, but several Canadian media and Lady Gaga said he took his own life. Lady Gaga, with whom he appeared in the clip Born This Way (2011), said news of her friend’s suicide was “beyond devastating.”

“The suicide of friend Rick Genest, Zombie Boy is beyond devastating,” she said in a Twitter message. “We have to work harder to change the culture, bring Mental Health to the forefront and erase the stigma that we can’t talk about it.”

Dulcedo Management called him an “icon of the artistic scene and the world of fashion.” Genest was born and grew up in a suburb of Montreal.

At the age of 15, he had a brain tumor, according to Canadian media. A year later, he got his first tattoo and took the street alias Zombie while living in mostly abandoned buildings and immersing himself in Montreal’s underground punk scene. Within a few years, his tattoos had grown to cover 90 percent of his body, earning him two mentions in the Guinness Book of Records. He held world records for having the most bones tattooed on his body, and the most insect tattoos.

In 2011, his appearance in the Lady Gaga video launched his international fame. From Paris to Milan, Berlin and New York, the model appeared in a growing number of fashion shows, notably for Thierry Mugler and for singer Jay-Z’s ready-to-wear collection.

In 2012, he appeared in a L’Oréal advertisement that went viral on social media, and increased his number of followers worldwide. The next year, he also appeared in the movie 47 Ronin with Keanu Reeves.

British artist Marc Quinn is crafting a 3.5-meter (11.5-foot) bronze sculpture of Genest set to be shown at the London Science Museum’s new Medicine Galleries late next year.

Published: 05-08-2018 08:14

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