Stories By 'Associated Press'
Thousands of people filled the streets of Brazil’s main cities Friday, and schools, banks and some public transportation shut down, as Brazilians angry over a pension reform and budget cuts held the first general strike of far-right President Jair Bolsonaro’s administration.
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A unit of wheat is called a bushel, and a standard weight of potatoes is called a century. But hemp as a fully legal US agricultural commodity is so new that a unit of hemp seed doesn’t yet have a universal name or an agreed-upon quantity.
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Ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft say they are willing to change the way they treat drivers in California as long as state lawmakers don’t require them to classify drivers as employees, a move that would entitle them to a wide range of benefits.
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Wilfido Briñez considers himself lucky to live with the roar of electric generators outside his front door in Maracaibo, Venezuela’s second largest city and ground zero for the nation’s rolling blackouts.
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France’s prime minister said Wednesday that the government of President Emmanuel Macron plans to keep reforming the economy to boost its competitiveness, with changes to unemployment benefits and the pension system and plans to help out middle-class workers with tax cuts.
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Crowds booing. Chants of “Cheat, cheat, cheat!” It became the background noise at the World Cup for David Warner, something he expected in England in the wake of a 12-month ban from the Australian team for his involvement in a ball-tampering saga last year.
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Two oil tankers near the strategic Strait of Hormuz were damaged in suspected attacks on Thursday, an assault that left one ablaze and adrift as sailors were evacuated from both vessels and the US Navy rushed to assist amid heightened tensions between Washington and Tehran.
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