Nepal’s economy to grow by 6.94 pc in 2016-17

  • Highest growth since fiscal year 1993-94 when the economy expanded by 8.2 percent
Post Report, Apr 25 2017
Nepal’s economic growth has been projected to grow by 6.94 per cent in the Fiscal Year 2016-17, as per the data released by Central Bureau of Statistics on Tuesday.
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India ready to help Nepal in concluding polls successfull, says Modi

  • Indian PM Narendra Modi calls PM Dahal
Post Report, Apr 25 2017
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has said that the Indian government would help Nepal government to successfully conclude the local level elections slated for May 14 and June 14.
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SC interim order directs govt to not take action against DIG Silwal

Post Report, Kathmandu, Apr 25 2017
Supreme Court on Tuesday issued an interim order directing the government not to take any action against Deputy Inspector General (DIG) Nawaraj Silwal.

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Govt begins process to increase local units in Tarai

Post Report, Kathmandu, Apr 25 2017
The government has started a process to increase local units in 11 districts of Tarai.

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Main News

Nepal-China first ever joint military drill concludes

Post Report, Apr 25 2017
The first ever joint military drill between Nepal and China has concluded on Tuesday.
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Nothing can stop elections: CEC Yadav

Post Report, Apr 25 2017
Chief Election Commissioner (CEC) Ayodhi Prasad Yadav has claimed that the two-phase elections would not be halted under any circumstances.
full story »

NC unveils manifesto for local polls

Post Report, Apr 25 2017
The key constituent of the ruling coalition, Nepali Congress, has unveiled its manifesto for the upcoming local level elections slated for May 14 and June 14.
full story »

Money

World

A Thai man filmed himself killing his baby daughter on Facebook Live, before taking his own life, Thai police say.

The 21-year-old hanged his daughter, and then himself, at a deserted hotel in Phuket on Monday, reportedly after an argument with his wife.

A copy of the video was still available on Facebook on Tuesday afternoon.

Earlier this month, Facebook pledged to review its processes after footage of an American killing a man in Cleveland stayed online for hours.

Relatives of the Thai man, who has not been named, saw the distressing footage and alerted the police - but the authorities arrived too late to save the man and his daughter.

The footage shows the man tying a knot around his daughter's neck, before dropping her from a rooftop. He then retrieves the body.

Social media anger

The Facebook Live post was widely reported by Thai media, and went viral on social media, BBC Thai editor Nopporn Wong-Anan reports.

Thai social media users reacted with anger, while offering condolences to the family of the girl, our correspondent says.

Devastated relatives of the child, including the mother, picked up the body of the girl and her father from hospital on Tuesday.

There was no immediate comment from Facebook, where representatives are looking into details of the case.

Following the US killing, Facebook said it was "constantly exploring ways that new technologies can help us make sure Facebook is a safe environment".

"We prioritise reports with serious safety implications for our community, and are working on making that review process go even faster," blogged one of its executives last week.

At least 18 Kurdish YPG fighters and media officials were killed in Turkish air strikes on a headquarters of the militia in northeastern Syria on Tuesday, the British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights monitoring group said.

The YPG, a U.S. ally in the fight against Islamic State, did not immediately give its own precise death toll.

Turkey's military bombed the YPG and Kurdish militants in neighbouring Iraq early on Tuesday, widening a campaign against groups affiliated with the outlawed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK).

Syrian or Russian air strikes killed more than a dozen people and severely damaged a hospital in and around a town in rebel-held Idlib province on Tuesday, local medical workers and a monitoring group said.

The attacks came as Syria's air force and Russian jets intensified their bombardment of Idlib, the British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported.

Idlib is an insurgent stronghold, one of the few large areas still under rebel control in the west of the country. Rebels and their families who have chosen to leave areas under government siege around Damascus in evacuation deals have headed for Idlib.

A spokesman at the hospital in Kafr Takharim in Idlib told Reuters an air strike hit its courtyard killing 14 people, including patients.

The Observatory said there were no deaths from the hospital strike, but that the bombardment had put it out of action.

Separate air strikes southwest of Kafr Takharim killed at least 12 people including civilians and rebel fighters, the Observatory said.

North Korea conducted a big live-fire exercise on Tuesday to mark the foundation of its military as a U.S. submarine docked in South Korea in a show of force amid growing concern over the North's nuclear and missile programmes.

The port call by the USS Michigan came as a U.S. aircraft carrier strike group steamed towards Korean waters and as top envoys for North Korea policy from South Korea, Japan and the United States met in Tokyo.

Fears have risen in recent weeks that North Korea would conduct another nuclear test or long-range missile launch in defiance of U.N. sanctions, perhaps on the Tuesday anniversary of the founding of its military.

But instead of a nuclear test or big missile launch, North Korea deployed a large number of long-range artillery units in the region of Wonsan on its east coast for a live-fire drill, South Korea's military said. North Korea has an air base in Wonsan and missiles have also been tested there.

"North Korea is conducting a large-scale firing drill in Wonsan areas this afternoon," the South's Office of Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement.

The South Korean military was monitoring the situation and "firmly maintaining readiness", it said.

The South's Yonhap News Agency said earlier the exercise was possibly supervised by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

North Korea's state media was defiant in a commentary marking the 85th anniversary of the foundation of the Korean People's Army, saying its military was prepared "to bring to closure the history of U.S. scheming and nuclear blackmail".

"There is no limit to the strike power of the People's Army armed with our style of cutting-edge military equipment including various precision and miniaturised nuclear weapons and submarine-launched ballistic missiles," the official Rodong Sinmun newspaper said in a front-page editorial.

North Korea's growing nuclear and missile threat is perhaps the most serious security challenge confronting U.S. President Donald Trump. He has vowed to prevent North Korea from being able to hit the United States with a nuclear missile and has said all options are on the table, including a military strike.

Trump sent the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier strike group for exercises off the Korean peninsula as a warning to North Korea and a show of solidarity with U.S. allies.

South Korea's navy said it was conducting a live-fire exercise with U.S. destroyers in waters west of the Korean peninsula and would soon join the carrier strike group approaching the region.

China, North Korea's sole major ally which nevertheless objects to its weapons development, has repeatedly called for calm, and its envoy for Korean affairs, Wu Dawei, was in Tokyo on Tuesday.

"We hope that all parties, including Japan, can work with China to promote an early peaceful resolution of the issue, and play the role, put forth the effort, and assume the responsibility that they should," Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters in Beijing.

Japan's envoy on North Korea, Kenji Kanasugi, said after talks with his U.S. and South Korean counterparts that they agreed China should take a concrete role to resolve the crisis and it could use an oil embargo as a tool to press the North.

"We believe China has a very, very important role to play," said the U.S. envoy for North Korea policy, Joseph Yun.

South Korea's envoy, Kim Hong-kyun, said they had also discussed how to get Russia's help to press North Korea.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is expected to meet Russian President Vladimir Putin on April 27, the Kremlin said. It did not elaborate.

RARE SENATE BRIEFING

Matching the flurry of diplomatic and military activity in Asia, the State Department in Washington said on Monday U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson would chair a special ministerial meeting of the U.N. Security Council on North Korea on Friday.

Tillerson, along with Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and Joint Chiefs chairman General Joseph Dunford, would also hold a rare briefing for the entire U.S. Senate on North Korea on Wednesday, Senate aides said.

A North Korean foreign ministry spokesman said those meetings called by U.S. officials clearly reflected the U.S. pressure that could "ignite a full-out war" on the Korean peninsula.

"The reality of today again proves the decision to strengthen nuclear power in quality and quantity under the banner of pursuing economic development and nuclear power was the correct one," the unidentified spokesman said in a statement issued by the North's state media.

On Monday, Trump called for tougher U.N. sanctions on the North, saying it was a global threat and "a problem that we have to finally solve".

"The status quo in North Korea is also unacceptable," Trump told a meeting with the 15 U.N. Security Council ambassadors, including China and Russia, at the White House. "The council must be prepared to impose additional and stronger sanctions on North Korean nuclear and ballistic missile programmes."

The official China Daily said it was time for Pyongyang and Washington to take a step back from harsh rhetoric and heed calls for a peaceful resolution.

"Judging from their recent words and deeds, policymakers in Pyongyang have seriously misread the U.N. sanctions, which are aimed at its nuclear/missile provocations, not its system or leadership," the newspaper said in an editorial.

"They are at once perilously overestimating their own strength and underestimating the hazards they are brewing for themselves."

The nuclear-powered submarine the USS Michigan, which arrived in the South Korean port of Busan, is built to carry and launch ballistic missiles and Tomahawk cruise missiles.

A roadside bombing targeted a minivan in Pakistan's northwestern tribal region on Tuesday, killing nine people, a local government official and the military said.

The blast ripped through the van as it was travelling through a minority Shiite region of the Kurram tribal area, which borders Afghanistan, said Arif Khan, a tribal administration official in the town of Parachinar. The area has long been the scene of sectarian violence.

A woman and two children were among the nine killed, Khan said. The explosion also wounded 13 people. With few adequate medical facilities in the area, a Pakistani army helicopter evacuated the wounded to a nearby military hospital.

No group immediately claimed responsibility for the attack. Pakistani Taliban and other Sunni militant groups often target minority Shiites whom they consider to be heretics. The Islamic State group has also claimed several recent attacks in the country.

For over a decade, Pakistan has been fighting Islamic militants who have killed tens of thousands of people. Islamabad has also undertaken several large-scale offensives in the tribal regions in an effort to rout militants from the area.

Also on Tuesday, Pakistani paramilitary forces raided an apartment in the port city of Karachi, acting on a tip that militants were hiding there, police officer Aurangzeb Khattak said.

The paramilitary force said that after a seven-hour siege, three militants, including a woman, blew themselves up inside the apartment. The explosion also killed a 5-year-old child. A fourth militant was killed trying to flee the scene.

Karachi has long been home to political, ethnic and militant violence.

Entertainment

Health & Style

Saturday Features

Time hangs heavy

Tuesday marks two years since the Nepal Earthquake 2015, but the scars and wounds left behind by the disaster, particularly at various heritage sites in the Valley, still remain massively uncured,

Unification fever

Guffadi
First of all, let us thank our government for giving us a public holiday on Monday so that our President need not see the traffic jam in the city as she left for India.

Beyond reconstruction

NEETU POKHAREL, SOM NIROULA
April 2017 marks the second anniversary of the devastating earthquake in Nepal, which took almost 8,860 lives, injured 22,000, damaged 602,257 houses, and rendered thousands of people homeless.

(Not so) Open Spaces

Looza Mahaju
In a few months’ time, Newars of Kathmandu valley will celebrate Gathe Muga, and in doing so will celebrate the openness of Kathmandu that now solely exists in photos and nostalgic memories of old and not-so-old-timers (such as yours truly).

Leave no one behind

Dr Rolina Dhital
It is now approaching two years since the day we lived through the devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake. These two years have been a rollercoaster ride of emotions for most of us, a time of fear, anxiety, anger and frustration, punctured by brief glimmers of hope.

There and back again

Aditi Adhikari
In 2004, my family and I went to Langtang with some family-friends. Although many details of that trip faded over the years, I revisited many times the awe that I felt when I woke up in Kyanjin Gompa,

Vertigo in the Valley

AAGAT RUCHI SAPKOTA
During the Maoist insurgency and the tenuous peace that followed, Kathmandu Valley’s population boomed like never before.

The Greater Good

Kavre, Paanchkhaal, was our first destination. The people there expected us to only mend and reconstruct the houses—bringing them back into their previous shapes—that were destroyed. But we had something else envisioned. We wanted to build an integrated model settlement; a settlement wherein every family in the community would come together to share a space where all the resources would be distributed equally to all the families.

The Red Line for Holi

Supriya Manandhar, Nasala Chitrakar
In light of last month’s social media furore regarding harassment during Holi, the authors conducted a short poll to understand the extent and dimension of the issue. Here is what they found