From Ground Zero: Tikapur tangle needs political solution; 24-hour curfew for last five days

AKHILESH UPADHYAY, Aug 29 2015
Deserted streets, beefed-up security, a fearful population and sinister rumours. A 24-hour curfew for the last five days. This has been the scene in this far-western Tarai town since eight people, including a senior police officer, were killed by an angry mob on Monday.
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NHRC team reaches Gaur to assess security situation

Post Report, Kathmandu, Aug 29 2015
Cargo trucks that have travelled all the way from India queue at Bargachi Chowk in Biratnagar before being escorted by police to their destinations. As vehicular movement in Morang district has come to a complete halt due to the ongoing banda and protestsPost Photo: Jitendra Sah
A team of National Human Rights Commission has started assessing the security situation of banda-hit Gaur in Rautahat district.

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Court quashes plea against Army move

Post Report, Kathmandu, Aug 29 2015
Supreme Court
The Supreme Court on Friday quashed a writ filed against the government’s decision to send the Army to riot-affected Kailali, Rautahat and Sarlahi districts.

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Prolonged curfew sparks food shortage in Tikapur

THAKUR SINGH THARU & GANESH CHAUDHARY, TIKAPUR (KAILALI), Aug 29 2015
Ten-member family of Santaram Dagaura, a freed Kamaiya (bonded labourer) at Manuwa, has been forced to live on an empty stomach due to the prolonged curfew in Kailali.

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Main News

5 dead in Nuwakot landslips

PRAKASH ADHIKARI, Aug 29 2015
Five people were killed, one went missing and six sustained injuries in landslides triggered by incessant rainfall in Gosyang and Samari VDCs on Thursday night.
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Everest: Sherpas to repair dangerous Khumbu Icefall route

BBC, Aug 28 2015
A team of specialised Nepalese Sherpa mountaineers have begun work to repair the climbing route on Mount Everest four months after it was destroyed by a devastating earthquake.
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Police stations removed from western Tarai

Post Report, Aug 28 2015
Nepal Police removed its security posts from western Tarai’s Madhesi and Tharu majority areas while Armed Police Force removed its highway security posts.
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Money

Editor's Pick

What caused Kailali carnage

THAKUR SINGH THARU, GANESH CHAUDHARIAug 26 2015
Senior Superintendent of Police Laxman Neupane, chief of the Seti Zonal Police Office, was in Tikapur for the past few days as tension flared in the area which could lead to a confrontation between the supporters of Tharuhat and Undivided Far West.
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Sports

SS Events Pvt Ltd is organising the second Century Bank Corporate Super Sixes at the TU grounds from September 26 to 30.

The six-a-side 24-team tournament will be a league-cum-knockout event where top two finishers from each of the eight groups will make it to the pre-quarterfinals. Century Bank is sponsoring the tournament and is in its second year in its three-year partnership with SS Events.
Century Bank has been providing Rs 600,000 to SS for each edition. While the tournament will be played in white ball and coloured dress, the organisers will provide jersey to the respective teams. The champions of the event will get a free entry into the next edition.
SS Events CEO Raman Shiwakoti said the tournament will help in establishing smooth relations between the corporate houses. “The members from the corporate houses will be able to perform at a single platform in this tournament. We are expecting an exciting event ahead,” said Shiwakoti.
Century Bank Deputy CEO Jeevan Bhattarai said the partnership with SS comes as a part of their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). “We have been focusing on health, education and sports as part of our CSR initiatives and this tournament has been a part of it. The tournament went pretty well in the previous edition and we are expecting it to get bigger this time,” said Bhattarai during a press conference on Wednesday.
Shiwakoti said his company had focused to come up with additional events—Inter-college and Club Level cricket tournaments—but their preparation was hampered by the April 25 Great Quake and they had to be content with organising the Super Sixes event. Civil Bank is the defending champions of the tournament.

Health & Style

Fiction Park

DÉJÀ VU

Rupak Dhakal, Aug 23 2015
A man tries to do away with the wall of separation between him and his world, until he no longer needs to
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Editor's Pick

What caused Kailali carnage

THAKUR SINGH THARU, GANESH CHAUDHARIAug 26 2015
Senior Superintendent of Police Laxman Neupane, chief of the Seti Zonal Police Office, was in Tikapur for the past few days as tension flared in the area which could lead to a confrontation between the supporters of Tharuhat and Undivided Far West.
full story »

Saturday Features

I get into the safa tempo all sweaty and covered in the valley dust. There is room for only two. I sit opposite a woman in a yellow kurta suruwal trying to cover her head with her cotton shawl—there are drops of sweat on her forehead and nose. She looked like she could use a shower right then. While everyone waited for the empty seat beside me to fill up, I tried to think of insignificant things. But my mind kept going back to the poem that a friend had recently sent on my Facebook messenger. It was called “Bhumiputra”—son of the land. The son of the land in a perpetual struggle to belong. I had known what the poem meant—it was meant for the Tharus who had lost their lives, the Tharus who have been misrepresented, the Tharus who have been discriminated against, her Tharus, her sons of the land. But I asked anyway what the poem was about. She replied, “to Tharus”. Her angst, her frustration, and her knowledge all got mixed into words that are familiar to our tongue—words of wisdom. I refrained from replying; after all, what do I know of the plight of Tharus, when was I ever taught about their history, and when have I ever sat down with them to talk about their concerns?

Our land is no longer the fertile land my father studied, or my mother sowed corriander seeds on. It is soaked in the blood of the sons and daughters, fathers and mothers, friends and foes who came with hopes and continued to struggle. One day, perhaps, when a farmer ploughs the land, she will discover that the colour of our soil is no longer brown but shades of maroon. However, what is scarier is that it will not surprise her. For generations and generations, Nepalis will have grown accustomed to the red soil. Stories about how the soil used to be brown will become a part of the myth no one will be willing to believe. My friend’s poem will also become one with the red soil and run through its veins.
A young boy, probably around 13 years old, got into the tempo. He looked like he was going for an interview, dressed up in a checkered shirt and cotton pants. As he settled beside me, he took out a smartphone from his right pocket along with the earphones. As the tempo stuttered to life, he pushed the earphones onto his ears, turned on the phone, pressed the password, opened an app for music, scrolled through an extensive list of songs, and selects a Hindi song. I guessed it was his favourite.
I tried to imagine what the boy does—he was too young to own a mobile phone (or go for an interview), but he was traveling on his own and looked self-sufficient. Perhaps he’d bunked his classes? But where was his uniform? Perhaps, he wasn’t as young as he looked. He continued to listen to his music. I got back to thinking.
Our land is no longer the fertile land my father studied, or my mother sowed coriander seeds on. I think of the vegetable garden that I never get to stroll on nowadays. A guava tree, a peach tree, some mint bushes, and a patch for vegetables. For a long time, my mother used to tend to the garden on her own—she always made sure the seasonable vegetables grew on the season, that the right amount of mixture of organic and chemical fertilisers were put on the plants, and that the trees were pruned on time. My father was never around much, but he would give his occasional comments. But to be honest, it was the flowers that my mother really cared for. She would look after the flowers without needing to consult my father. She knew exactly when the flowers needed to be watered, or when they would bloom, and when they needed the nutrients. I wonder what her reaction would be if she were to one day dig one of the flowerpots and discover that the soil had turned red.
I looked outside the window and realised my stop had arrived. The kid was still beside me. I got off and started to walk towards New Road Gate. As I took a left turn, an old man with a pipe coming out of his stomach was being showered with five-rupee notes. It was a bizarre scene; his face wrinkled with untold stories, his head raised to look at the passersby, his body lost in his yellowed overalls; a rag in front of him was covered with five-rupee notes. I do not know what to make of Kathmandu.
“I miss my son,” said my friend as soon as I met him. His eyes glistened with the longing for his two year old son in Karnali. He recounted what he had heard in the news, the death of an innocent infant by protestors. The horror was evident on his face. I did not know what to make of Kailali, or Karnali. I do not know what to make of anything. All I know is my friend’s longing will also become one with the red soil and run through its veins.