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Mental health of migrant workers is a pressing issue, but it has been ignored

  • Experts say government needs to step up efforts to ensure well-being of Nepalis working abroad
ARJUN POUDEL, May 18 2019
Post Photo
Last year, the Ministry of Health and Population sent a team of doctors, including psychiatric consultants, to South Korea at the request of the Ministry of Labour, Employment and Social Security to look into the deaths of Nepali workers in foreign land.
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Drought parches Sindhuli villages

RAJ KUMAR KARKI, DAKAHA (SINDHULI), May 19 2019
Girls and women in Dudhauli Municipality-2, Sindhuli, carry water in vessels to their houses. Water sources in the area have dried up.Post Photo: Raj Kumar Karki
After the water source in Dakaha Bazaar in Dudhauli Municipality-4, Sindhuli, dried up a few months ago, they scoured every possible source of water around their settlement, albeit without any success.

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Who runs this bank? Women.

ABANI MALLA, Kathmandu, May 19 2019
Women run the show at the Tripureshwor branch of Agriculture Development Bank in Kathmandu.Post Photo: Beeju Maharajan
By 10 in the morning, the shutters of the Agriculture Development Bank in Tripureshwor are lifted and customers begin to gather in its foyer, forming a queue at the cash counter. Sharmila Chaudhary, who primarily looks after credit, helps out the bank tellers during the morning rush.

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Game of one-upmanship begins in ruling party as power play intensifies

TIKA R PRADHAN, Kathmandu, May 19 2019
Pushpa Kamal Dahal (right) believes KP Sharma Oli will hand over the reigns to him halfway through the government’s five-year term.Post File Photo
When two leaders of the ruling Nepal Communist Party—Pushpa Kamal Dahal And Ishwor Pokhrel—sparred over ideological issues at a public function last week, many saw it as the beginning of a debate that is likely to heat up over the political line the unified party will follow.

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On education, government looks generous with words but stingy with funds

Binod Ghimire, Kathmandu, May 18 2019
The budget ceiling provided to Education Ministry shows the allocation for the education sector will hover around 10 percent. Nepal has committed to setting aside 20 percent.Post File Photo
In its election manifesto, unveiled in November 2017, the left alliance, now the unified Nepal Communist Party, pledged to allocate 20 percent of the national budget for the education sector.

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Thriving tourism in Namuna community forest benefits many local residents

NABIN POUDEL, NAWALPARASI , May 19 2019
A rhino grazes in the Namuna Buffer Zone Community Forest in Kawasoti Municipality, Nawalparasi (East).Post Photo: Navin Poudel
The Namuna Buffer Zone Community Forest in Kawasoti Municipality of Nawalparasi (East) is one of the few places in the country that can be seen as a great example of consistent communal effort.

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Main News

Chure forest in Sindhuli encroached

RAJ KUMAR KARKI, May 19 2019
Hundred bighas of forest lands at Jhunga in Dudhauli Municipality and Chandanpur in Kamalamai Municipality in Sindhuli district have been encroached upon for building private properties.
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Shauka folk start migrating back to Byas in Darchula

MANOJ BADU, May 19 2019
People from Shauka community, who had migrated to Khalanga—the district headquarters of Darchula district—to avoid the cold, have started to climb up to higher areas after the onset of summer season.
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Lack of proper buildings affects students in Kanchanpur schools

BHAWANI BHATTA, May 19 2019
Children studying at Janata Basic School in Bhimdatta Municipality-11, Kanchanpur, spend their days trying to keep themselves cool in their suffocatingly hot classrooms made of galvanized zinc sheets.
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World

Flash floods and landslides triggered by torrential rain in Indonesia’s easternmost province of Papua have killed at least 58 people, injured dozens and displaced more than 4,000, authorities said on Sunday.

A search for more possible victims was under way in the town of Sentani, which was hit by flash floods late on Saturday. Fifty-one people were killed and 74 injured there, Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, spokesman of the national disaster agency, told a news briefing.

Heavy rain caused landslides in the nearby provincial capital of Jayapura, killing seven there, Nugroho said.

Soldiers pulled alive a 5-month old baby from under the rubble of his house and took him to hospital, Papua military spokesman Muhammad Aidi said.

The number of victims “will probably increase because the evacuation process is still taking place and not all affected areas have been reached,” Nugroho said.

About 4,150 people are sheltering in six evacuation centers, he said.

Hundreds of houses, three bridges and a Twin Otter airplane parked at the airport were damaged by the floods. The Sentani airport, the province’s main transport hub, remained open.

TV footage showed mud and large logs on Sentani’s main roads after floodwaters receded.

Disaster authorities have warned local governments of flash flood risks due to deforestation in the mountains surrounding the town, Nugroho said, adding that in 2018 Jakarta sent seedlings intended for tree-planting.

“Forest destruction in the Cyclops mountains have increased for use as firewood and to turn the land into plantations,” Nugroho said.

“Since 2018 we have warned the Jayapura government to be careful of flash flood risks because of this deforestation,” he added.

Arts and Entertainment

Life & Style

Saturday Features

Internet cafés or ‘wangbas’ in China create a space for internet addicts

Tripty Tamang Pakhrin
Internet cafés in China have created a new space where people lose themselves within the virtual world of online gaming--a chance to explore an experimental world without any impediment.

'Nepalis come across a huge wall that divides one part of the world from another'

Avasna Pandey
The presence of Narendra Modi and Amit Shah at the helm has only made things worse. These people are bent on hardening borders, rather than dissolving them.

The beatmaker

ABANI MALLA
On a cold and rainy winter’s day, 19-year-old Sagun Khadka sits at a cafe in Jhamsikhel, listening to hip-hop on his headphones.

Shreesha Bhandari’s Athot deserves to be read by young people seeking guidance

MOHAN GURAGAIN
Without failing to shed light on the importance of time, Athot stresses that what we failed to do in our lives are not less important than what we actually did. 

Guffadi: Our Oli government is not a communist but a truly wild capitalist party

Guffadi
Once again, let us congratulate our Oli government for passing the Medical Mafia Bill. Now, Dr KC should go home and rest.

Celebrating a century

Prakash Chandra Timilsena
Calmly seated in a chariot pulled by her grandchildren, great grandchildren and great-great grandchildren, Mayju Maharjan observes her fifth janko—a rare ritual, called Mahadivya Ratharohan, where an elder is celebrated for completing 108 years, eight months, eight days, eight hours, and eight seconds around the sun. 

The paper trail

Prakash Chandra Timilsena
In 1995, 50-year-old Nima Sherpa moved from Dolakha to Kathmandu with a plan—he was going to take traditional Nepali lokta paper to the world. Sherpa had realised that products made of lokta, which were easily available in his village, could make it big in the international market.

Life and art are inextricably blended into each other

Timothy Aryal
Mekh Limbu’s art needs little elaboration. It speaks the truth, laid out for all to see and reflect on. It’s real; it’s quiet, keening and sharp. Take his installation ‘How I Forgot My Mother Tongue’, for instance, which was part of the Opposite Dreams exhibition displayed during the Photo Kathmandu festival last year.

Raamesh Koirala’s book about Charles Sobhraj is confused, leaving the reader unsure of whether this is a memoir or a novel

Pranaya SJB Rana
Raamesh Koirala’s new book about the notorious serial killer Charles Sobhraj is a strange animal. Although ostensibly presented as a non-fiction memoir written by the cardiac surgeon who operated on Sobhraj’s heart, the copyright page of the book asserts that “This is a work of fiction.” Perhaps this was an (glaring) oversight on the part of the publisher, but given the manner in which the book unfolds, it might be an accurate characterisation.