Internet cafés or ‘wangbas’ in China create a space for internet addicts

Tripty Tamang Pakhrin, Feb 02 2019

Internet cafés in China have created a new space where people lose themselves within the virtual world of online gaming--a chance to explore an experimental world without any impediment.
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The presence of Narendra Modi and Amit Shah at the helm has only made things worse. These people are bent on hardening borders, rather than dissolving them.
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On a cold and rainy winter’s day, 19-year-old Sagun Khadka sits at a cafe in Jhamsikhel, listening to hip-hop on his headphones.
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Without failing to shed light on the importance of time, Athot stresses that what we failed to do in our lives are not less important than what we actually did. 
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Once again, let us congratulate our Oli government for passing the Medical Mafia Bill. Now, Dr KC should go home and rest.
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Tags: Guffadi
Calmly seated in a chariot pulled by her grandchildren, great grandchildren and great-great grandchildren, Mayju Maharjan observes her fifth janko—a rare ritual, called Mahadivya Ratharohan, where an elder is celebrated for completing 108 years, eight months, eight days, eight hours, and eight seconds around the sun. 
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In 1995, 50-year-old Nima Sherpa moved from Dolakha to Kathmandu with a plan—he was going to take traditional Nepali lokta paper to the world. Sherpa had realised that products made of lokta, which were easily available in his village, could make it big in the international market.
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Mekh Limbu’s art needs little elaboration. It speaks the truth, laid out for all to see and reflect on. It’s real; it’s quiet, keening and sharp. Take his installation ‘How I Forgot My Mother Tongue’, for instance, which was part of the Opposite Dreams exhibition displayed during the Photo Kathmandu festival last year.
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Raamesh Koirala’s new book about the notorious serial killer Charles Sobhraj is a strange animal. Although ostensibly presented as a non-fiction memoir written by the cardiac surgeon who operated on Sobhraj’s heart, the copyright page of the book asserts that “This is a work of fiction.” Perhaps this was an (glaring) oversight on the part of the publisher, but given the manner in which the book unfolds, it might be an accurate characterisation.
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In 2015, when I appeared for a job interview at a popular Kathmandu school, the very first question the principal asked me was, “Are you a Newar?”
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Nepal’s reliance on rice over traditional nutrient-rich grains is costing the country billions every year, and making people unhealthier
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Tags: Nepalrice
I first heard of Tootle about seven months ago during a casual conversation with my friends. They said it was one of the easiest ways to commute around Kathmandu, but as the owner of a motorbike, I didn’t pay it any mind. A few months later, I became a part of Tootle -- not as a customer but as a rider. 
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At 11 am sharp every morning, a voice resounds through our quiet Kupondole neighbourhood, disturbing all our neighbours from their daily chores.
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I knew attachment was a rope that’dpull your legs the moment you find an escape,and cages are like magnets,sticking on metal,
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Referring to the sweeping authority that the parliament reinstated after the 2006 people’s movement wielded, to strip the king of all his historic and constitutional powers, people often said in jest that Nepal’s legislature was unable to do only one thing—to make the rivers flow upstream.
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