Stories By 'Richa Bhattarai'
Forgive us, we sound scattered,” says a spirit in Akwaeke Emezi’s debut novel, Freshwater. It is as if the book is asking forgiveness for its random and disjointed but wild flashes of brilliance that simply refuse to stitch themselves together into a seamless pattern.
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Can a book start a revolution? Ben Okri’s The Freedom Artist certainly intends to. The novel is an ardent entreaty to every single person in the world, an appeal to let go of their meaningless lives and rebel against expected but often nonsensical societal norms.
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A large populace reads your work only as translations. Don’t you think this creates a loss of your original text?” This question was put forth to author Perumal Murugan at the recently-held Jaipur Literature Festival.
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Sixteen-year-old Starr knows these rules by heart. When she was 12, her parents taught her how to deal with cops, because she isn’t “too young to get arrested or shot.”
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In ‘March, Me and Sakura’ by Geetanjali Shree, a 70-year-old Indian mother travels to Japan to be with her son. At first wary of the unfamiliar country and afraid of venturing out, she ends up an adventurous soul, freeing the child within in the new land, far from judgment and societal restrictions. It is enthralling to travel with her and shed our inhibitions alongside.
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The sun sets over the Howrah Bridge as fishermen reel in fresh batches of Hilsha. Nearby, a young, bespectacled, curly-haired poet in a Punjabi spouts Marx and Tagore in the same breath as he eats a dinner of maach-bhaat, ending it with a syrupy roshogolla.
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